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How Supreme Court defines Expert

Nurse Expert defined

Nurses are uniquely prepared to perform a critical review and analysis of clinical nursing care and administrative nursing practice to provide the foundation for testifying on nursing negligence issues.

The Supreme Court of Illinois held that a board certified internal medicine physician was not competent to testify as to the standard of care of a nurse. Citing the Amicus Brief submitted by The American Association of Nurse Attorneys, the court noted:

“A physician who is not a nurse is no more qualified to offer expert opinion

testimony as to the standard of care for nurses than a nurse would be to offer an

opinion as to the physician standard of care. Certainly, nurses are not permitted

to offer expert testimony against a physician based on their observances of

physicians or their familiarity with the procedures involved. An operating room

nurse, who stands shoulder to shoulder with surgeons every day, would not be

permitted to testify as to the standard of care of a surgeon. An endoscopy nurse

would not be permitted to testify as to the standard of care of a gastroenterologist

performing a colonoscopy. A labor and delivery nurse would not be permitted to

offer expert testimony as to the standard of care for an obstetrician or even a

midwife. Such testimony would be, essentially, expert testimony as to the

standard of medical care.” (Sullivan v. Edward Hospital., 806 N.E. 2d 645 (Ill.

paragraph text here.

many attorneys need to be educated on the value of Nursing experts as opposed to Physician experts. Physicians do not know what a care plan is, nor do they ever read Nursing notes! They are unfamiliar with Nursing standards of care, and therefore can be of little to n use for attorneys trying to execute their cases.

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